I Feel Like A (Pot)parazzi…

Instead of standing in a crowd yelling “Brad” or “Angelina” or “Elvis” and adding to the decline of civilization, I’m merely standing/sitting behind the tripod yelling “damn hot spots” or “shite, I scratched my graduated background again” or going upstairs and loading it all on the computer only to find a porcelain-ish fingerprint on the rim that I couldn’t see because my reading glasses make the LCD picture on the back of the camera clear but the pot’s just a blur when I look up from said camera. I guess it’s difficult to portray this kind of work as anything but tedious but I’ve got experience with that. Here’s some chocolaty goodness from every angle (or as they say in the south… hangle)…

bowl

bowl

bowl

bowl

More of the same today.

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14 Responses to “I Feel Like A (Pot)parazzi…”

  1. Miri Says:

    Boy that glaze is luscious and complements your work so nicely. It looks awesome with the black. I love your treatment of the foot–its a work of art in and of its self!

  2. gary Says:

    BEAUTIFUL 🙂

  3. judy Shreve Says:

    That ‘chocolat’ is yummy!

    I hate taking photos too. But yours are looking pretty good.

  4. Rose Bauer Says:

    Beauty pots! Your attention to detail is amazing.. dark glaze over white clay body … glaze application flawless on lovely turned foot ting…. sweet!

    I have done some work using a shellac resist technique but was never able to maintain such crisp lines? Do you sponge away the slip or use a water pick to remove the slip?

    cheers

  5. Richard Kollmar Says:

    The pots are handsome and you are a better-than-average photographer. The phot of Sofia, bibky in mouth, standing amidst the bisqued porelain, is alone worth the trip to this website.

  6. Rose Bauer Says:

    Beauty pots!
    Your attention to detail is amazing… dark glaze over white clay body … yet glaze application flawless on lovely turned foot ting…. sweet!

    I’ve used a shellac resist technique but was never able to maintain such crisp lines? Do you sponge away the slip or use a water pick to remove the slip?

    cheers

  7. Gordo Says:

    Chocolatey goodness is right!

  8. meredith Says:

    mouth watering……..

  9. Allen Says:

    Jim, I am seeing lens flare or something that is obscuring detail. Is your lens clean and shaded. In photoshop are you adjusting your levels and curves? The background is not neutral. Everything is leaning to the blue side and very flat in contrast. You are also not using a small enough aperture to have the pot sufficiently focussed. Of course you are using a tripod, so a longer exposure is no big deal. Where you are focussing is just fine. I would also make sure your white balance in camera is correct for the lights you are using. Beautiful pot, wonderful technique,Flawless glaze, great blog. I love it all.

  10. soubriquet Says:

    Looks really good, subtle, I like the semi-matt look of the glaze, I imagine it feels silky to the touch.
    I find I appreciate pots and sculpture as much by touch as by sight, is that strange?
    Long ago, I had a group of blind people as regular visitors to my pottery, they made me become far more thoughtful about texture, about the feel of a pot in your hand, its heft, it was fun to play with unexpected discrepancies in weight… A sighted person would never notice, but my blind visitors would laugh, and appreciate the hidden joke.

    I love how your pots look, but, I’d bet they’d still be a delight to a blind person.

    • jim Says:

      hi soubriquet, thanks for the nice words. i can see (no pun intended) how the blind would have a heightened tactile sense about pots and sometimes it frustrates me that it’s probably impossible to convey those qualities in a photograph. i’ve noticed with people that i watch pick up my pots that they are always fondling the surface as though it’s appealing and wish the photos could capture that.

  11. soubriquet Says:

    I think your photos do capture that…. Well, evidently they do to me, because they made me think about how my blind friends would have appreciated your pots.
    Obviously, the only person who can really say whether the photos are true to your pots, is you. However, I’d say they show an intriguing range of colour, of form, and of intricate, and tactile surfaces, I’m aware that I haven’t set up any sort of controlled photospace, and I’m therefore maybe not the best judge, but I’d urge you not to get too hung up on the photography.
    The pot’s the main event, not the photograph, the photo need not be perfect.

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